NICK PETERSON

As a performer, composer and author of numerous books and resources in the field of music teaching, Nick Peterson is an inspirational music educator who draws from a wealth of knowledge gained from over forty years of experience as a dedicated musician.

 

Beyond being a classically trained pianist, Nick is also adept in synthesizer technology and proficient both as a literate and ear-playing musician. A musical polyglot, Nick has been a keyboardist in a diverse range of ensembles including: Ethnic, Rock, Jazz, Soul, Latin American and Funk bands. Accordingly, he has toured with pop artists, played on ocean liners, accompanied innumerable club acts and gained experience with the acoustics of venues ranging from goat-sheds to the Sydney Opera House.

 

The breadth of musical perception gained from such extensive performance experiences is reflected in the broad range of styles in which Nick authentically composes. Professionally, he writes in assorted genres for radio and television advertisements and scores for live theatre productions. Educationally, Nick creates musical examples to specifically illustrate the musical devices he teaches. He composes and arranges music for classroom ensembles and creates tailored compositions for student performances. For his own pleasure Nick enjoys creating works which stretch musical boundaries, always seeking to broaden the scope of styles for which he writes.

 

The enhanced musical understanding acquired from such multi-faceted musicianship is at the very heart of Nick’s teaching. He delights in sharing his expertise; particularly in imparting insights that raise eyebrows and put smiles on faces. However, embedded in the light-hearted approach are ground-breaking methodologies that generate musical perceptions empowering students to reach their potential.  As an educator Nick maintains that music should be taught as a first language rather than as a second, and asserts that adequate education in a creative art form such as music should go beyond creating ‘clones’, producing instead: unique, independent and creative musicians.

PERFECT RHYTHM READING

DAY DATE MONTH | TIME

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Learn how to provide music students with the ability to read rhythms (even really difficult ones) perfectly and instantly. When students can read complicated rhythms at sight, learning pieces is unhindered; score reading is effortless and aural work becomes instinctive. Backtracking turns into forward progress, and frustration is replaced by fulfilment! In this session Nick reveals how these wonderful aspirations can indeed become a reality. 

 

The problem: So much time is wasted when music students learn new pieces ‘note-perfectly’, but with rhythmic errors. Teachers repeatedly have to correct the misinterpretations of familiar yet previously-treated rhythmic ideas and, frustratingly, students must relearn pieces.

 

The simple solution: The whole problem can be evaded if students do not make rhythmic errors in the first instance.

 

When students can effortlessly read complicated rhythms at sight, learning pieces is unhindered; score reading happens easily and aural work becomes instinctive. It all turns backtracking into forward progress, and replaces frustration with fulfilment! By teaching music in the manner of a first language, the way is paved for musical literacy.

 

In this session Nick reveals how these wonderful aspirations can indeed become a reality.  

SUPER SIGHT READING

DAY DATE MONTH | TIME

Consider the notions that if we can read our language effortlessly, and, if music is a language, why not apply the long-established language reading methodologies to dramatically improve music reading? This session introduces a graded and comprehensive program designed to dramatically improve the reading abilities of all pianists.

Reading (whether of language or music notation), depends on the ability to intellectually recognise, and physically execute a vocabulary. As a result there should be a transfer of meaning.

 

But all too often, pianists are steered into hastily decoding one note at a time devoid of understanding. And with little attention given to coordination (physicality that is vital to fluency), there is never certainty as to whether the notation will fall within the pianist's capacity. Consequently sight reading is undertaken tentatively. Logically, adequate training would have it tackled confidently.

 

This session introduces a graded and comprehensive program designed to dramatically improve the reading abilities of all pianists. By progressively combining music’s constituent vocabularies (rhythmic, melodic and harmonic), to increase the repertoire of intellectual and physical skills, the way is paved for fluent sight reading; reading music as naturally and meaningfully as reading a language; a first language.

© 2020 by Music Teachers' Association of NSW. ABN 33000033447. All rights reserved.